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New ways of investing in development

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By dxw

As part of the International Year of Evaluation, Wilton Park partnered with the Centre for Development Impact (CDI) to discuss the evaluation of of new market-oriented investments

New frontiers for evaluation in an era of market-oriented development

Monday 20 – Wednesday July 2015 | WP1411

diaspora, economic growth, economy, environment, ethical investment, innovation, evaluation,
Handing over of the torch to Wilton Park: Robin Hart, Wilton Park; Marco Segone, UN Women; Chris Barnett, Centre for Development Impact (CDI); Robert van den Berg, Centre for Development Impact (CDI)

We are proud to have hosted an event as part of the International Year of Evaluation with the Centre for Development Impact (CDI). The Evaluation Torch passed through Wilton Park, symbolising the global network of evaluation partners that are being brought together throughout 2015.

The group convened to discuss the growing trends in impact investing and other forms of market-oriented investments and to identify how the traditional evaluation approaches, particularly of public sector donors, can be adapted to support the impact assessments of these new investments.

Innovation and flexibility will be needed with evaluators providing regular and visual assessments of impact to assist decision making in investments.

The meeting was organised with support from the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) and the Department for International Development (DFID)

Earlier in the year we focused on the global development agenda at our meeting on Beyond aid ahead of the agreement of the global Sustainable Development Goals.

diaspora, economic growth, economy, environment, ethical investment, innovation, evaluation,
Handing over of the torch to Wilton Park: Robin Hart, Wilton Park; Marco Segone, UN Women; Chris Barnett, Centre for Development Impact (CDI)

Further information

Conference: New frontiers for evaluation in an era of market-oriented development

Report: Beyond aid: innovative governance, financing and partnerships for the post-2015 agenda

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Comments

KARORI SINGH says

The conference is indeed very significant consultative exercise for contemplating 17/169 SDGs based on the past experience. They are comprehensive in terms of major structural, institutional, attitudinal and institutional changes to eradicate extreme poverty and eliminate or at least contain growing inequality in a global perspective. It has identified 'three elements' to ensure the success of SDGs, 'no one should be left behind' the third element is more crucial. The elite behaviour is highly ambivalent in the developing countries. They will prove themselves very enthusiastic to accept the SDGs and undertake policy and legislative measures commensurate to them but sabotage them at the level of implementation and prevent any international monitoring mechanism by cultivating nationalist sentiments on the name of
their sovereignty. Such a behaviour/attitude of the elite in the developing countries will greatest hurdle in realising SDGs by 2030. I understand the focus of the Conference was to facilitate the SDGs exercise in the global context but things are more complex at the national and local level wherein the conflict of interest is so entangled

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