New configurations of international order: a system creaking or cracking?

15 October, 2015

The global system and architecture set up in the aftermath of the Second World War are largely still in place. Are they still fit for purpose, and how well is the rise of emerging powers being accounted for?

New configurations of international order: values, principles, alliances and alignments

Sunday 22 – Wednesday 25 November 2015 | WP1436

What is the most prevalent in state policy making; the values and principles which guide governments in all actions? The alliances nations have formed with neighbours and those of common cause, and indeed those alliances that will be formed? Are these alliances to be as formalised as something like NATO? Or is the global system to be a system of looser alignments based around particular interests and issues?

The international system we live within is largely unchanged from the frameworks put in place after the Second World War. Even in times of turmoil, the pre-eminence of Europe and the United States of America acted to bolster this consensus. While they still have a major stake in global affairs, the rise of the BRICS, other assorted states in South East Asia and the Middle East, not to mention transnational actors, this pre-eminence and dominance is slipping into history. The ending of that dominance should inspire exploration of new strands of thinking and possibilities.

We will be discussing these and other questions at our event in Brazil next month.

Related events

New configurations of international order: values, principles, alliances and alignments (2015)

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