Wilton Park in 2014 – what does power mean in the modern world?

17 January, 2014

We start the year by considering the future of power and the challenges of modern diplomacy and policy planning – a theme which continues throughout our conferences in the first part of the year.

We began by looking at how power is defined in the world today, how this concept is changing, and who will have power in the near future. This will be explored further in conferences throughout the year which will consider some of the most pressing challenges to modern diplomacy.

The future of power

In association with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, the Ministry of Defence and the National Intelligence Council, The future of power: implications for global actors by 2040 brought together experts from across the world – including the UK, Europe, the US, Canada, China, Brazil and Pakistan – to discuss likely future trends in global power relationships between countries, governments and civil society. This theme will be continued with a related subject during Soft power in action, which will consider how influence can be exercised through more indirect forms of diplomacy between nations, such as through trade and exchanges of culture.

How the UK’s strategic relationships will look in the future is a theme that is explored later in the first part of this year, with EU programmes and action in fragile and conflict states: next steps for the comprehensive approach and Preparing for the 2014 NATO summit.

The challenges faced by a growing multitude of global actors in the near future will be explored over a range of conferences in the coming months.

Climate change

How to adapt to and limit the problems presented by climatic changes will be discussed in Strengthening technological capacities and information access for improving disaster risk reduction in the Horn of Africa and Real green economies.

International trade and development

Economic prosperity is a key part of being able to exercise power and influence. International economic cooperation can also empower countries across the world to provide better lives for their citizens. 2014 will be a year in which international agreements will be negotiated to continue shaping the framework of the global economy. With this in mind, we are convening a conference next month on a major free trade agreement between the US and EU, Transatlantic trade and investment partnership (TTIP): creating regulatory coherence. An earlier event, Post-2015 development framework: priorities for least developed countries, will aim to give the least advantaged countries in the global community a voice to promote their priorities when the new Sustainable Develop Goals are being designed.

Promoting values

Being an international actor is not just about asserting power; it is also about promoting values. How to better ensure individuals are treated justly no matter what country they are from is the basis for discussions of the tenth in our series of annual human rights conferences, Addressing implementation gaps: improving cooperation between global and regional human rights mechanisms. What role religion can play in development policy will also be explored in Religion, foreign policy and development: making better policy to make a bigger difference.

Looking ahead to a changing world

A changing world will give rise to many new priorities and 2014 promises to be a year of great diplomatic activity amongst a growing number of global actors – government and non-government. Through our conferences, we will continue to convene groups who would not otherwise meet to tackle the major challenges and respond to political events taking place around the world.

Further information

Conference: The future of power: implications for global actors by 2040

Conference: Soft power in action

Conference: EU programmes and action in fragile and conflict states: next steps for the comprehensive approach

Conference: Preparing for the 2014 NATO summit

Conference: Strengthening technological capacities and information access for improving disaster risk reduction in the Horn of Africa

Conference: Real green economies

Conference: Transatlantic trade and investment partnership (TTIP): creating regulatory coherence

Conference: Post-2015 development framework: priorities for least developed countries

Conference: Addressing implementation gaps: improving cooperation between global and regional human rights mechanisms

Conference: Religion, foreign policy and development: making better policy to make a bigger difference

 

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